Crete did it first

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The Cretans did it first in the world

 

What is Crete famous for? What have Cretans done before any other people in the world? What did Crete do first in the world? Read on for a list of Crete's firsts.

Crete is known throughout the world as the birthplace of the European civilization  for its incredible beaches and coves lapped by turquoise waters and for its beautiful and unspoilt nature. Crete is now one of the most famous destinations for summer holidays.

Cretans are priding themselves for being 'the best in the world' when it comes to certain feats. They're also not afraid to tell people about all the great things this tiny island achieved. Alike the rest of Greeks, Cretans believe that their nation is superior than the rest of the world. Please be aware that many of these things are said for fun and Cretans aren't all raging ego-maniacs, but some of them might not be joking at all. 

So,  here's a list of a few things Crete did first!

 

The first robot. Talos

The first robot in history was Talos, the bronze giant of Crete. According to mythology it was built by the god Zeus or Hephaestus and was given as a gift to the Cretans to protect the island from invaders. Talos patrolled the island three times every day and repelled enemy ships by throwing huge stones at them. Those who managed to land he would burn them with his hot breath or embrace them with his glowing body and burn them. Talos was killed by the Argonauts on their return from Colchis. His only weak point was a screw in his heel, sealing off the only vein containing ichor that ran through his entire body. With Medea's help the Argonauts removed the screw and all the ethereal liquid gold poured out, killing him.


 
 

The first flight. Daedalus & Icarus

According to Greek Mythology, Daedalus was the most famous Athenian architect and craftsman. Daedalus was blamed for the death of his nephew Talos and exiled from Athens. He fled to Crete with his son Icarus where they were welcomed by King Minos.
During his stay on the island and while he was in the favor of Minos, Daedalus constructed many complex works and built the Labyrinth, in which the mythical Minotaur was locked. Minos forbade him to leave Crete and imprisoned him in the Labyrinth. He managed to escape the island by making wings for him and his son, Icarus, which helped them fly and escape from Minos. It was during this escape that Icarus did not heed his father's warnings and flew too close to the sun; the wax holding his wings together melted and Icarus fell to his death.


 
 

The first condom. Minos the king of Crete


Minos had a wife called Pasiphae who, tired of his infidelity, cast a spell on him that caused him to spew serpents and scorpions every time he ejaculated. To prevent the boys and girls he made love to from being killed by his lethal semen, Minos got his great court inventor, Daedalus, to create the world’s first condom made of goat’s bladder.


 
 

The first to cultivate the olives

The olive tree was first cultivated for commercial use in Minoan Crete from 3000 BC. and was a source of wealth for the Minoans. Through the centuries the olive tree and olive oil are inextricably linked to Crete's traditions, customs, architecture, religion.


 
 

The first to do sports

The Minoans were the first to systematically engage in sports and the organization of sports events.
From depictions of sports on vases, frescoes and seal stones it appears that they engaged in wrestling, boxing, bullfighting and acrobatics.
A relief ryto found in Agia Triada (Phaistos), and dating to the 16th century BC, is divided into zones with representations of boxing, wrestling and bullfights.


 
 

The first to visit America

Some scientists, based on a dialogue written by the Greek historian Plutarch, who lived from 46 to 119 AD. says that Minoans reached America hundreds of years before Christopher Columbus.
The purpose of their travels during the Bronze Age was related to trade and the transportation of high-grade copper from Lake Superior on the border of the US and Canada.
After the Minoans, the Mycenaeans continued the journey. Later, during the Iron Age, interest in the region declined.


 
 

The first to use flush toilets

The Minoans built advanced underground clay pipes for sanitation and water supply. The Capital of the Minoan civilization, Knossos, had a well-organized water system for bringing in clean water, taking out waste water and storm sewage canals for overflow when there was heavy rain.
The ancient Cretans possibly constructed the first  flush  installation for pouring water into.

 


 
 

The first to use landfill sites

Landfilling is by far the longest-established method of waste disposal by humans. The earliest evidence of landfill sites can be traced back to c. 3,000 BCE in the capital city of Knossos on Crete. The ancient Minoan civilization of that era discarded their solid garbage (including ceramic wine cups now thought to have been used on a single-use basis) in large pits, which were then backfilled with earth over several levels.

 


 

https://el.wikipedia.org/wiki/%CE%94%CE%B1%CE%AF%CE%B4%CE%B1%CE%BB%CE%BF%CF%82

https://greekreporter.com/2022/10/07/ancient-greeks-america-before-columbus/

https://hakaimagazine.com/news/did-ancient-greeks-sail-to-canada/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_water_supply_and_sanitation

https://www.guinnessworldrecords.com/world-records/636988-first-landfill-sites